Ottawa lawyer David Hollingsworth reports on snowmobile accident on Sharbot Lake and sad death of Robert Lee.

Snowmobile Accident Lawyer

Sadly a  50-year-old man died on his snowmobile late Saturday afternoon.  Robert Lee was riding his snowmobile  on Sharbot Lake. Robert Lee, from Central Frontenac Township was riding when he lost control of his snowmobile and  hit an embankment, close to 400 metres from the shore, where he had just been standing with friends. When Robert Lee’s snowmobile hit the embankment, he flew in the air and then hit the ice . Sadly, he was rushed to a nearby hospital in Perth but had already died.  Although he was wearing a helmet, sadly it was not enough to save his life. My thoughts go out to the friends and family of Robert Lee.

Snowmobile accidents often tend to be very serious accidents and often result in the most serious of injuries.  Like in this accident, wearing a snowmobile helmet and protective gear is often not enough to prevent serious injuries and often times snowmobile accidents can result in catastrophic injuries, including:

If you have been involved in a snowmobile accident  Ontario or have an Ontario driver’s licence, it’s important that you be informed of what you are entitled to. Regardless of who is at fault for the snowmobile accident, a snowmobile is considered to be a motor vehicle and therefore entitled to Ontario accident benefits compensation. Accident Benefits compensation can cover expenses such as housekeeping, income replacement benefits, caregiver benefits, rehabilitation benefits, attendant care benefits, death benefits and other related expenses.

Call our Ottawa personal injury lawyers for a free consultation to discuss your snowmobile accident and what your options are for starting a personal injury lawsuit and start receiving the benefits and accident compensation you need and are entitled to. We are highly experienced in snowmobile accidents.


How to know if the ice is safe while snowmobiling in Ontario.

Avoiding Snowmobile Accidents

Did you know that an average of 40 people visit an emergency department for injury resulting from a snowmobile accident in Ontario ? The weather is warming up slightly and I wanted to remind snowmobile drivers of the dangers of crossing water at this time of year.  I know most snowmobile riders are experienced and  know when it is safe to cross but given the number of accidents each year, I figured a reminder might be timely.

Please be sure to always check ice  conditions before venturing out , as we all know conditions  change in just a couple of hours.  A buoyant snowmobile suit is always best to wear while riding on frozen lakes or rivers. Please always bring an  ice pick with you and make sure it is always accessible. Your stopping distance increases  when travelling on ice, so slow down. If you must go on ice, ride on ice that is new, hard and clear. Always avoid all ice that is slushy, or close to moving water.

Ontario Ministry of Transportation Speed Limits for snowmobiles:

50 km/h – on snowmobile trails
20 km/h – on roads where the speed limit is 50 km/h or less
50 km/h
– on roads where the speed limit is over 50 km/h

Hopefully we can have fewer snowmobile accidents this year and all riders can continue to enjoy their sports safely !

If you have been injured in a snowmobile accident and want to know which accident benefits you are entitled to, contact our personal injury lawyers for a free consultation. We represent people throughout eastern Ontario who have been injured and are highly experienced in the nuances of snowmobile accidents. We have helped thousands of others and we can help you.

 

 


Boy struck while standing beside his snowmobile resulting in severe head injury.

Snowmobile accident results in head injury

Metcalfe Accident

Sadly, a 16 year old male remains in critical condition in Ottawa’s CHEO trauma centre after a terrible accident on 8th Line Road and Glenwood drive, close to Metcalfe, Ontario. The accident happened last night around 10 pm. The teen had been standing beside his snowmobile at the side of the road when he was hit by another vehicle and thrown several feet away.  He suffered a severe head injury, as well as serious injuries to his body and legs.  He remains in critical condition at CHEO. What a terrible thing to have happened to this young boy.  My thoughts are with his family at this very stressful time and I hope he is able to recover fully from this awful accident.

It has been reported that the driver who hit this young boy fled the accident scene. He has since been tracked down but Ottawa police are still investigating. If you have any information that could help, please contact the Ottawa police at 613-236-1222 ext 2481.

A snowmobile is considered to be a motor vehicle when it comes to insurance claims and compensation. What this means is that in most cases, people injured in a snowmobile accident are entitled to Ontario accident benefits, regardless of who is at fault.  Our personal injury Ottawa lawyers work closely with people who have been injured in a snowmobile accident and who need support, medical specialists and compensation. Snowmobile accidents  often result in catastrophic injuries, leaving individuals unable to return to a quality of life they once had.  This may mean not returning to work or living a life of pain and suffering as a result of a snowmobile accident.

If you would like more information on how our personal injury Ottawa lawyers can help you rebuild after your accident, contact us for a free consultation and we would be happy to come and meet you .

 


Are Ontario snowmobile accidents entitled to Ontario accident benefits ?

Snowmobile Accidents and Accident Benefits Insurance Claims

There are far too many snowmobile accidents each year. A tragic snowmobile accident took another life: the life of  a 24 year old man in Val des Monts yesterday.  My thoughts go out to his family and friends and I am truly sorry for their loss.  I have many clients who have injured themselves in a snowmobile accident . A snowmobile is considered a motor vehicle and yes, Ontario accident benefits apply to snowmobile accidents.  So the good news is there is support and compensation for people who suffer injuries in snowmobile accidents.   The bad news is, there seem to be a lot of snowmobile accidents in our region and some of them are sadly,  fatal. Please ride safely…

Transport Canada  has prepared an amazing site full of interesting information that relates to road and snowmobile safety. For example, did you know that there are over 700,000 registered snowmobiles and more than 161,000 km of snowmobile trails in Canada?  Snowmobiling can be safe and enjoyable. As long as drivers are cautious and follow safety rules, there is no reason not to get out and enjoy a fantastic sport.

The Canadian Council of Snowmobile Organizations or CCSO highlighted that between the years of 1994 and 1999, when promoting safety and  snowmobiling became a focus, snowmobile accident fatalities dropped by 2% – from 96 to 94 deaths;however the number of snowmobile drivers increased by 40%. This goes to show that more and more people can ride safely ,when safety is a focus.

Avoiding Snowmobile accidents safety tips:

  • Tell someone where you plan to go and when you plan to get there.
  • Ensure that your snowmobile is tuned up.
  • Dress properly to protect yourself and avoid hypothermia, especially in children.
  • Always have a  first aid and survival kit available.
  • Ride at your own speed.
  • Try to use snowmobile trails whenever possible.
  • Remain on the right side of all roads, paths and trails.
  • If you don’t know  the area, slow down and drive cautiously.
  • Be careful crossing roads and train tracks.
  • At night, drive with headlights and slow down.
  • Know the  ice conditions and if you are unsure, do not cross.
  • Always  wear flotation-type clothing.
  • Always be on the look out for wildlife.

It’s impossible to completely avoid all accidents but please, let’s try.  Snowmobiling does not need to be a dangerous sport.  Be safe and ride as safely as possible. Enjoy !

 

 

 

    

 


Ontario injury lawyer: What does an Ottawa personal injury lawyer do ?

Ottawa Personal Injury Lawyer David Hollingsworth…What does an Ottawa personal injury lawyer do?

Ottawa personal injury lawyers help Ontario accident victims and their families get the help, support and compensation they need following an accident in Ontario. An Ottawa personal injury lawyer not only represents and negotiates for you when it comes to your insurance claim, they also help in rebuilding lives after an Ontario accident. The best Ottawa personal injury lawyers work closely doctors, social worker and the entire rehabilitative team to ensure that accident victims have the best possible recovery. An Ottawa personal injury lawyer can help refer accident victims to specialists and help locate resources in the community.

As an Ottawa Personal Injury Lawyer, I specialize in the following areas:

Ontario Spinal Cord Injury, Ontario Brain Injury, Ontario Amputation Injury, Ontario Head Injury, Ontario Whiplash Injury, Ontario Slip and Fall Accidents, Ontario Wrongful Death Accidents, Ontario Accident Benefits Insurance Claims, Ontario Orthopedic Injury, Ontario Broken Bones Accidents, Ontario Catastrophic Injury, and Ontario Traumatic Injury.

If you or a loved one has been injured in an Ontario car accident, there is help and support available to you.  You do not have to do this on your own. Contact an Ottawa personal injury lawyer for help.


Are Ontario accident benefits available to snowmobile accidents? Ottawa lawyer David Hollingsworth explains.

Ontario Snowmobile Accident Lawyer, Ottawa Injury Lawyer David Hollingsworth..The weather we have been getting here in eastern Ontario has left many snowmobilers and ice fishing enthusiasts in a dangerous position.  It seems as though one day, mild weather is on it’s way and the next we are hit with 15 centimetres of snow.  What concerns me as an Ontario injury lawyer is how dangerous it can be out there on the ice. The most obvious snowmobiling rule is to never cross water as there are no guarantees that ice is thick enough to support a human or a motor vehicle such as a snowmobile. Ice is always dangerous and could break open at any point. I would caution everyone to stay clear of frozen water it is absolutely certain it is safe.  

Snowmobiles have  far less traction for starting, turning, and stopping on ice than they do on snow. It is always best to travel at slower speeds, allowing a snowmobile driver to keep better control  and  fast stop on shorter notice. Trying to stop a snowmobile that is travelling at higher speeds typically results in spins, which are not only dangerous but can be fatal. For best control, it is best to drive your snowmobile from a seated position.

Snowmobile accidents on Ontario lakes are far too common.  Most Ontario lakes are flat, wide open areas, but they are not free of obstructions. Remember, if you can ride and turn in any direction while operating on a lake, so can other snowmobile riders. That means that another driver could appear out of nowhere. A snowmobile accident could happen at any time.  Although there are many head on snowmobile accidents each year in Ontario, drowning is a leading cause of fatal snowmobile accidents. To be safe, it’s always best to wear a floatation snowmobile suit and ride with ice picks.

What to do if you fall through the ice..

If the ice breaks and you fall through the ice, try to stay calm. Place your arms out  in front of you on the outer unbroken ice . Try to kick your feet to propel yourself up onto the ice. Keep doing so until the ice stops breaking.  If you don’t have an ice pick, use anything sharp such as keys or a knife to help dig into the ice and give you a grip. Don’t remove your gloves. Once you get up onto the  ice, crawl away from the hole. Absolutely do not stand up until you are safely far away from the hole as standing up increases the chances of the ice cracking.

A snowmobile is considered to  be a motor vehicle. All snowmobiles must be registered, no matter what they’re used for or where they’re used.  Safety is so important to enjoying snowmobiling. Each year, many accidents happen that are completely preventable,  causing needless death and injury each year.

If someone you know or if you have been injured in an Ontario snowmobile accident, you many be entitled to Ontario accident benefits through your own insurance. If you have not insured your snowmobile, you may still be entitled to Ontario accident benefits.  There are options out there and help for you. Consult an Ontario personal injury lawyer to discuss how you can get some help.

———————- Our  Ottawa Injury Lawyer Blog is written regularly by Ontario personal injury lawyer David Hollingsworth. The Ottawa Injury Lawyer Blog reports on accidents in eastern Ontario, personal injury issues, local Ottawa news and events and various news that relates to Ottawa, accidents and personal injury. Visit  www.ottawainjury.ca for more information. If you have a topic you would like me to write about or  if you have a question,  please call or email me: david@ottawainjury.ca (613) 978-9549

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Ottawa Ontario snowmobile accident lawyer David Hollingsworth, Ontario Accident Benefits Snowmobile Accidents


Ottawa personal injury lawyers who can help with support and maximum compensation for injury.

Ottawa Personal Injury Lawyer David Hollingsworth…Since 1999, our experienced personal injury lawyers  at www.ottawainjury.ca have helped thousands of Ontario accident victims and their families get the support and compensation they need after an accident. Our Ottawa personal injury lawyers bring an exceptional legal team that is dedicated to our clients.  We are constantly being recommended by past clients. We work extremely hard to ensure that we are doing everything we can to help.  We understand how difficult your life is after an accident.  We meet daily with people whose lives have been affected by tragedy,so we know that there are many things we can do to help you.  You should not even be thinking about things like bills and compensation.  You should be thinking about your recovery, your family and yourself.  We are here to listen, to understand, to fight for you and to get our Ontario personal injury clients everything you need. We have a long list of past clients who would be happy to speak with you and tell you what we were able to do for them.   If you or a loved one has suffered serious personal injury accident, we want to help you and give you the help and support you need. We work on contingency; which means you do not need to pay us at all until you have received your settlement cheque. We know you are going through a lot and we are sorry.  Let us help you….


Ontario snowmobile accidents and safety hand signals: Ottawa lawyer David Hollingsworth

  Ottawa Personal Injury Lawyer, Ontario Personal Injury Lawyers David Hollingsworth…With all this new white fluffy snow we have in Ontario, I know that avid snowmobilers will be out on their snowmobiles this weekend and for the rest of the winter season.  There are an incredible amount of Ontario snowmobile accidents each year and I cam across some great information posted on snowmobilers.org website. It’s a great site that shares all sorts of valuable information for snowmobile driving in Ontario. Please, if you are driving a snowmobile, drive the speed limit, stay off of questionable ice  and never drive if you have been drinking.  Most of all, enjoy the season safely !  Snowmobile hand signals:
Giving clear, easy-to-see hand signals are so important to safe snowmobile riding in Ontario. Be sure to never make hand signals subtle, always make clear, deliberate signals. Be sure that other snowmobile drivers behind you can see your signals. Hand signals are a very reliable way to communicate while riding.
 
   
stop Stop:  Your arm raised from the shoulder and extended
straight up over your head with palm of your hand flat.
 
stop Left Turn: Your left arm extended straight out from your shoulder and pointing in the direction of the turn.
 
stop Right Turn: Bend your left arm at your elbow to shoulder height; with your hand pointing straight up and your palm flat, your arm  makes a right angle.
 
stop Oncoming Sleds: Guide all snowmobile to the right while pointing to the trail over your head. This way your signal can be seen.
stop Slowing:  Your left arm extended out and down from the side of your bodywith a downward flapping motion of hand to signal warning or caution.
stop Sleds Following: Your arms raised, your elbow bent with your thumb pointing backward, in hitchhiking motion move your arm forward to backward over your shoulder.
stop Last Sled in Line: Your left arm raised at your shoulder height, your elbow bent and your forearm vertical with your hand clenched in a fist.

The  Ottawa Injury Blog is written regularly by Ottawa Ontario personal injury lawyer David Hollingsworth. Since 1999, David has been an Ottawa Ontario personal injury lawyer representing Ontario accident victims who have suffered a personal  injury and the families of accident victims who have lost a loved one in an Ontario accident. This blog reports on accidents in eastern Ontario, personal injury issues, local Ottawa news and events and various news that relates to Ottawa, accidents and personal injury.  Visit www.ottawainjury.ca for more information. If you have a question, feel free to call or email david@ottawainjury.ca  (613) 978-9549 

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Ottawa Personal Injury Lawyer David Hollingsworth, Ottawa snowmobile accident lawyers


Ride and stay alive ! Ontario Snowmobile Accidents Safety Tips, Ottawa Lawyer

Snowmobile Accident Lawyerssnowmobileaccident

I have yet to ride a  snowmobile myself,  but I can understand the attraction.  Sadly, every year in Ontario, the number of snowmobile accidents is staggering.  Winter is certainly upon us and I thought after this week’s big chill, it might be a time where more riders are out on their vehicles ( yes, a snowmobile is a motor vehicle) and thought I’d share some very obvious basic safety tips that simply serve as a reminder to everyone out there heading out on their sleds.

Snowmobiling in Ontario:

If you plan on riding across Ontario lakes or Ontario rivers, investigate the conditions before you go and  cross only by following marked stake lines. For your safety, follow these safety tips:

  • Wear a bright, buoyant snowmobile suit.
  • Carry ice picks at all times.
  • If your snowmobile breaks the ice:
  • Place hands/arms on unbroken ice while kicking hard to propel your body as far as you can onto the ice, like a seal.
  • Kick vigorously into a horizontal position and swim to the nearest ice edge.
  • Once clear, stay flat and roll away to stronger ice.
  • Quickly replace wet clothes, keep moving to generate body heat, and find immediate shelter and warmth if possible.

Avoiding Snowmobile Accidents at Night:

9/10 snowmobile fatalities, occur after dark. Slow down, don’t overdrive your headlights. Becoming disoriented or lost is much more likely to happen at night. Wear bright outer clothing with reflective trim on the arms, back and helmet. Never ride your snowmobile alone at night. Always dress in your full reflective snowmobiling outfit even if your intending to just go next-door. You never know….

Avoid Alcohol= Avoiding Snowmobile Accidents- Sadly, alcohol is involved in over 70% of snowmobiling accidents that tragically end in death.  Any amount of alcohol can impair your perception, slow your reaction time and limit your ability to control your sled at a critical moment. Operating your snowmobile while under the influence of alcohol is punishable under the Criminal Code of Canada. If convicted of driving a snowmobile while impaired, you will lose all driving privileges (car, truck, motorcycle, off-road vehicles and snowmobile).  In other words, if you drink and drive your snowmobile,  both your driver’s license and insurance are at risk.

Reduce the Chances of a snowmobile accident by driving defensively.

Engine noise and your helmet may impair your hearing, so be extra alert for danger. You can only control your snowmobile driving, not how others drive.  Your safety is in your own hands, so watch out for a variety of conditions, including:

  • Oncoming sleds
  • Obstacles hidden by the snow
  • Trees and branches on the trail
  • Slow grooming equipment
  • Bridges, open water and
  • Other trail users (skiers, walkers)
  • Wildlife
  • Unexpected corners, intersections and stops
  • Trail wash outs and flooding
  • unsafe ice
  • Snow banks and moguls
  • Road and railway crossings
  • Logging operations

Get out there and enjoy this beautiful, cold winter we are having….but please be safe.  Before you hop on your snowmobile, take a few seconds to prepare yourself in the event of a snowmobile accident.  Should you be involved in an Ontario snowmobile accident, know that there are accident benefits to which you are entitled to through your car insurance. Contact an Ontario personal injury lawyer to find out how best to maximize your compensation.

  • Source: Ontario Federation of Snowmobile Clubs