Avoiding car accidents and Highway Safety rates roof strength in rollover car accidents

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety looks at different vehicles each year and  released a study as to which rates roof strength in small SUVs. I  feel that this is an important study to keep an eye on. If I were in the market for a new vehicle ( which unfortunately I’m not !) , I would want to know which vehicles hold up best in the event of a car accident.  The study to which I am referring to looked specifically at the roofs of cars.  As a consumer, I would be thinking about rollover car accidents and how best to protect myself and my passengers.

The study rated as follows:

Good Ratings

  • Honda Element
  • Volkswagen Tiguan
  • Subaru Forester
  • Jeep Patriot

Acceptable Ratings

  • Toyota RAV4
  • Nissan Rogue
  • Suzuki Grand Vitara
  • Mitsubishi Outlander
  • Chevrolet Equinox/Pontiac Torrent

Marginal Ratings

  • Honda CR-V
  • Ford Escape/Mazda Tribute/Mercury Mariner

Poor Ratings

  • Kia Sportage/Hundai Tucson

Insurance Institute for Highway Safety statistics indicate that 10,000 people are killed every year in rollover car accidents. Obviously better built roofs do a better job at protecting their passengers , by keeping them in the vehicle .  The solid roof also helps to keep the car together on impact.

It makes a lot of sense to me.  Drive safely out there !

 


Recommended child safety seats: reduce deaths, injuries and damage

As a father of three kids, all still in car seats, I found this information extremely useful and thought I’d pass it on. I found it on a related law blog prepared by HG Farber, a lawyer in Seattle.  He has an excellent blog full of valuable personal injury information.  I encourage you to check it out…Let’s keep our kids safe.                                             -David

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), an independent and non-profit, scientific and education organization which is dedicated to reducing deaths, personal injuries and property damage in accidents reports that 13 of the 41 child booster seats they examined could not be recommended. I find this shocking !!

I was shocked to read that booster seats for children ages 4 to 7 years old only reduce personal  injury risk by 59% over seat belts alone.  As reported by a study by Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.  Booster seats  are designed to elevate young children so that seat belts are positioned correctly and therefore will ensure safety. The IIHS evaluated booster seats for safety.  They look at things such as safety in crash tests,  the position of the seatbelt and other very important safety factors.

The Institute recommends these 10 best booster seats:

  • Volvo booster cushion
  • Recaro Young Style
  • Graco TurboBooster
  • Fisher-Price Safe Voyage
  • Combi Kobuk
  • Fisher-Price Safe Voyage
  • Britax Parkway
  • Fisher-Price Safe Voyage
  • LaRoche Bros. Teddy Bear
  • Safeguard Go
  • Britax Monarch

10 not recommended booster seats include:

  • Safety Angel Ride Ryte backless
  • Cosco/Dorel Traveler
  • Cosco/Dorel (Eddie Bauer) Summit
  • Graco CarGo Zephyr
  • Evenflo Big Kid Confidence
  • Evenflo Generations
  • Compass B505
  • Compass B510
  • Dorel/Safety 1st (Eddie Bauer) Prospect
  • Cosco Highback Booster
  • Cosco/Dorel Alpha Omega
  • Evenflo Chase Comfort Touch
  • Safety 1st/Dorel Intera

Our children are everything ! Keep them safe !


What are “Accident Benefits” ?

David Hollingsworth, Ottawa Personal Injury Lawyer has a team of professional working with him in the area of Accident Benefits. Following is a summary of the most commonly-accessed accident benefits. It is not a complete list of all available benefits.

  • Income replacement. You are entitled to 80% of your net income to a maximum of $400 per week if you are substantially unable to perform the essential tasks of your occupation or employment during the first 104 weeks. Thereafter, you can continue to receive these benefits as long as you are continuously disabled from any occupation for which you are reasonably suited by education, training and experience for up to $400 a week or 80% of your net income.
  • You may receive non-earner benefits of up to $185 a week if you are not employed. If you suffer a complete inability to carry on a normal life as a result of the injuries from the accident. No benefits are payable under this category for the first six months after the accident.
  • Caregiver costs of up to $250 a week, if you were the primary caregiver of a person in need (with whom you were residing), plus $50 for each additional person in need of care
  • Medical and rehabilitation costs (above OHIP) to a maximum of $100,000 for up to 10 years for a non-catastrophic injury, and up to $1,000,000 for the rest of the victim’s life in the case of a catastrophic injury.
  • Special Attendant Care of up to $3,000 a month for two years for a non-catastrophic injury, and up to $6,000 a month for the victim’s lifetime for a catastrophic injury.
  • Housekeeping and Home Maintenance of up to $100 per week.
  • Death Benefits of $25,000 for the spouse of the victim; $10,000 for each of the victim’s dependents; $10,000 to the person who cared for the victim; up to $6,000 for funeral expenses.
  • Travel Expenses for family members or those living with the accident victim for their visiting costs during treatment or recovery.
  • Lost Education benefits for students to a maximum of $15,000.

For more information, contact David  at   www.ottawainjury.ca or e-mail david@ottawainjury.ca